Utskick 210416

1. CfP: RECONFIGURING TIMESPACES OF CHILDHOOD (TAMPERE HUB)
2. CfP: ESSHC 2022, GÖTEBORG
3. CfP: HISTORY OF INTELLECTUAL CULTURE: INTERNATIONAL YEARBOOK OF KNOWLEDGE AND SOCIETY
4. PUBLIKATIONER

1. CONFERENCE: RECONFIGURING TIMESPACES OF CHILDHOOD (TAMPERE HUB)
Conference: Reconfiguring Timespaces of Childhood (Tampere Hub) of
Spinning the Sticky Threads of Childhood Memories From Cold War to Anthropocene Satellite conference, 20-21 October 2021, https://events.tuni.fi/recollectreconnect2021/

Memory is a productive force that (re)shapes the pasts, presents, and futures. Memories are also of and about relations (Arnold, Shepherd and Gibbs, 2008). They exist in relations with times and spaces, ourselves and others, events and objects, with humans and non-human species. It is possible to approach memories as distributed between humans and more-than-human participants. On the one hand, material objects are constitutive of (collective) memories (e.g. childhood objects, monuments, museums) and help establish social identities. How we collect, store, categorize and represent memories also gives a shape to them. On the other hand, by being virtually present in events, memories “materially affect the world (just as they themselves are affected by events)” (Fox and Alldred, 2019, 21).

Inspired by the broad theme of webs and threads, we call on participants to think about memories beyond the ‘mnemonic fever’ (Huyssen, 1995), which marks our time obsessed with recording and archiving for self-fashioning or collective heritage. We ask:

How do childhood memories connect and are connected to events that produce the world around us?
How do remembering and forgetting childhoods forge connections across times and spaces?
How do the means of (re)collecting, storing, memorizing, and (re)presenting memories affect how, what, and whose childhoods are being re-collected and produced as social identities?
How do personal memories impact the production of social (including the human and more-than-human) continuity and change?
How do childhood memories of nature and the planet – from rock collections to foraging in forests or looking after injured wildlife – form attachments to place, land and Earth during the Anthropocene, and reactivate emotions associated with geological processes and multispecies common worlds?
How do the unfinished transformations that were part of the Cold War complicate and continue to influence the trajectory of the futures in the present? Do memories carry unrealized (past) futures and anticipatory visions that disrupt the present or reconfigure the future (Craps et al. 2018, 503)?
How do practices of archiving life (in museums, and on social media, websites etc,) produce lives, biographies, selves, worlds, social identities etc.? How do objects, photos, videos, and other types of representations play a role in those?

Abstract submission NOW OPEN: https://events.tuni.fi/recollectreconnect2021/abstract-submission/
Deadline 1st of May, 2021

The conference is organized by Reconnect Recollect – a collaborative, international and interdisciplinary project that creates dialogues among people divided by multiple borders – geopolitical, economic, generational and cultural – inherited from and reordered after the Cold War. Bridging academic research and art, the project (re)collects memories of diverse childhood experiences during the Cold War, bringing into public view alternative and multiple personal histories that have the potential to transfigure divisions into connections in new and bold ways.

For more information, please visit the website or contact us on recollectreconnect2021@tuni.fi

2. CfP: ESSHC 2022, GÖTEBORG
The 14th European Social Science History Conference 20-23 April 2022 is organized by the IISH in co-operation with the University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden. The networks include Education and Childhood.

The deadline for paper and session proposals is 15 may 2021.

For more info, see https://esshc.iisg.amsterdam/en/esshc-conference-2022

3. CfP: HISTORY OF INTELLECTUAL CULTURE: INTERNATIONAL YEARBOOK OF KNOWLEDGE AND SOCIETY
Editors: Charlotte A. Lerg (München), Jana Weiß (Münster) and Johan Östling (Lund)

History of Intellectual Culture (HIC) is a new international and interdisciplinary open access yearbook for peer-reviewed papers, published by De Gruyter. It is the succession of the journal of the same name, founded in 1999 by Paul Stortz and E. Lisa Panayotidis at the University of Calgary, Canada. A pioneering part of open access digital publishing among history journals, it was one of the first publications to focus on the cultural dimension in the history of knowledge and ideas.

Building on this heritage, the yearbook continues to emphasize cultural dimensions of the history of knowledge and underscores that knowledge must be regarded as a fundamental category in society. In doing so, ideas, concepts, ideologies, theories, and cognitive practices are located within their social and material contexts. To understand the theory, production, practices, and circulation of knowledge, we relate intellectual traditions, discourses, lived experiences, and identities to resources, social conditions, and power structures as well as to organisations, infrastructures, and media systems. In short, we conceptualize knowledge as politically, socially, culturally, and economically formed.We welcome contributions that engage with the history of knowledge from a cultural perspective that include but are not limited to the following themes:

institutions, systems, and infrastructures
circulation (e.g. geographical, biographical, temporal)
media and materiality
practices, performances, formations, and formats
structures, agency, and power relations
resources and socials conditions
identity, memory, and community

Guided by these conceptual and methodological considerations, HIC provides a forum for publication of original research and the promotion of rigorous and critical discussion. We particularly invite new voices and early career researchers. Grounded in history we distinctly encourage interdisciplinary approaches with the aim of stimulating productive exchanges, expanding conventional notions, and enriching public discourse.

For more info, see https://www.degruyter.com/serial/HICU-B/html

4. PUBLIKATIONER
Backman Prytz, Sara & Anne-Li Lindgren (2020). Att studera förskolan utifrån historiska källor. I: Annika Åkerblom, Anette Hellman & Niklas Pramling (Red.), Metodologi. För studier i, om och med förskolan. Malmö: Gleerups.

Broberg, Åsa, Viveca Lindberg & Wärvik Gun-Britt (2021) Women’s vocational education 1890–1990 in Finland and Sweden: the example of vocational home economics education, Journal of Vocational Education & Training, DOI: 10.1080/13636820.2021.1889646

de Coninck-Smith, Ning. ”Gender Encounters University-University Encounters Gender: Affective Archives Aarhus University, Denmark 1928-1953.” Women’s History Review 29, no. 3 (2020): 413-428.

Lundh Nilsson, Fay and Per-Olof Grönberg. ”A Technical Workforce for Regional Industrial Development? Origin and Dispersion of Graduates from the Technical Secondary Schools in Malmö and Borås 1855-1930.” The Scandinavian Economic History Review ahead-of-print, no. ahead-of-print: 1-27.

Lövheim, Daniel (2021) Cold War fostering of scientific elites: International Youth Olympiads in chemistry and physics 1967–1984, History of Education, DOI: 10.1080/0046760X.2021.1890239

Westberg, Johannes, “What were the main features of nineteenth century school acts? Local school organization, basic schooling, a diversity of revenues and the institutional framework of an educational revolution”, Rivista di Storia Economica, XXXVI, no. 2, agosto 2020, 139-173. https://www.rivisteweb.it/doi/10.1410/100137